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February 11, 2012 / stephaniepomfrett

An elegant Victorian lady reading

This week’s Sepia Saturday theme is ‘reading’, which is a common theme amongst my photo collection. I picked the lady above as I thought her clothes were so gorgeous. This picture is from a carte de viste and she must have been quite an upper-class woman to afford such luxurious clothing! If you’d like to see more readers in my collection, do click on the ‘reading’ and ‘book’ categories at the side of the page.

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9 Comments

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  1. Padam Desai / Feb 11 2012 11:48 am

    wow great one

  2. Joy / Feb 11 2012 2:25 pm

    She has made quite a statement with her carte de visite. I love the drape jacket it looks so luxurious, I wonder if it was silk.

  3. QMM / Feb 11 2012 2:57 pm

    Love the lady, the look and that chair. Great post.
    QMM

  4. Tray / Feb 11 2012 3:29 pm

    Beautiful photo

  5. Velvet Sacks / Feb 11 2012 3:58 pm

    Her clothing is beautiful indeed. I would think reading would be one of the few things she could do while wearing such a long, full skirt, but if she could afford such luxurious clothing, she probably didn’t have to concern herself with many physical activities.

  6. Margaret / Feb 11 2012 4:23 pm

    The draped (silk?) jacket looks like it has an oriental flair. The chair and table look ornate and fit the time period, but the wall looks very modern with the splattered paint. I wonder if this was a common background for studios back then. When my daughter was a baby (17 years ago) she had primary color paint splashes asmthe background wall.

  7. viridian61 / Feb 11 2012 5:02 pm

    her clothes could be silk, they look like velvet to me (Which in thsoe days was silk woven and cut into a ‘pile’)

  8. Christine H. / Feb 11 2012 10:19 pm

    I can just imagine the sound of the dress as she walked down the hall. I’d run though – she looks very stern and none too friendly.

  9. Alan Burnett / Feb 12 2012 7:06 am

    It makes you wonder what on earth was in these books that were obviously kept as props in photographers’ studios. Whatever it was it always seemed to make the readers fascinated in the content.

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